Environment & Conservation

BROOME householders, businesses and agencies are closer to being able to preserve fragile, unique ecological communities in the region while conserving the town’s natural heritage as it develops.

IT IS difficult to imagine a positive outcome from the spread of the highly destructive cane toad (Rhinella marinus) but research shows with the toad’s spread some animal numbers may be increasing, including an endangered bird species.    

AS PART of Conservation Week (November 1-8) ScienceNetwork WA invited Perth Zoo to share some of the work being undertaken to conserve wildlife. Today, read about a collaborative Carnaby’s Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus latirostris) research project which could help conserve future populations of these iconic WA birds.

AS PART of Conservation Week (November 1-8) ScienceNetwork WA invited Perth Zoo to share some of the work being undertaken to conserve wildlife in Western Australia. Today, read about a collaborative project to reintroduce bush stone-curlews (Burhinus grallarius) to metropolitan Perth.

IT MIGHT look cute and cuddly, and no bigger than a large mouse, but the endangered red-tailed phascogale (Phascogale calura) is a true survivor.

MALES competing for female attention is nothing new but research into frogs in swamps near Albany has revealed something unusual—larger, stronger-armed males fare better fathering offspring in isolation while smaller, weaker males are more successful in a group.

IT WOULD come as no surprise to hear that people who live in a certain area and consume a certain diet—perhaps residents of Perth’s more affluent suburbs—may present themselves in a certain way to show off to everyone else.

Mid West find prompts records rethink

Saturday, 24 October 2015

SCIENTISTS working on the extensive Bush Blitz species documentation program have added another two flora species to the ever-expanding record of WA flora species.

UNDERSTANDING how WA plants live and thrive in a certain soil type has been the focus of a recent review by scientists and the findings may help rehabilitate the environment, especially mined areas.

INFRARED cameras have been used to monitor crop stress for years, but a WA plant biologist recently used the technology to ensure the successful translocation of a critically endangered plant species near Albany.