Fisheries & Water

BABY turtles born on a WA beach are having trouble navigating into deep water because of artificial lights such as those from ships and offshore resource projects.

Published in Fisheries & Water

SHARK Bay and the coastline off Karratha and Perth may be popular eateries for whale sharks (Rhincodon typus), satellite tracking has revealed.

Published in Fisheries & Water

SCIENTISTS working to return abalone to a once-flourishing population on the notoriously wild coastline north of Kalbarri have enjoyed their first major success—with new juvenile abalone recruits popping up in the region.

Published in Fisheries & Water

THE coral wonderlands of the Abrolhos Islands off the Mid West coast, and the fishing industries that rely on them, are at worse risk of damage from climate change than previously thought.

Published in Fisheries & Water

IF YOU’RE faced with your own mortality you would do nearly anything to improve your chances of survival, right? So too for a species of seagrass called Posidonia australis that grows in Shark Bay.

Published in Fisheries & Water

EFFORTS to restore Shark Bay’s seagrass meadows by transplanting Posidonia australis at the edge of existing meadows are being hampered because resident fish are using the new seagrass as fast food.

Published in Fisheries & Water

SCIENTISTS have used drones to chronicle migrating whales off the WA coast, revealing that lactating and adult humpbacks (Megaptera novaeangliae) suffer a decline in body condition during the southern migratory season.

Published in Fisheries & Water

AUSTRALIAN scientists have identified cost-effective ways to help marine populations ‘bounce back’ after major disturbances, using a case study of spangled emperor (Lethrinus nebulosis) at Ningaloo Reef.

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WILUNA residents will have tastier and healthier drinking water thanks to a $1.7 million water treatment plant upgrade.

Published in Fisheries & Water

THE sight of a shark’s dorsal fin sticking out of the water usually strikes fear into the hearts of swimmers but for a group of WA researchers every time a tagged tiger shark’s (Galeocerdo cuvier) dorsal fin stuck out of the water represented another opportunity to gather more information.

Published in Fisheries & Water
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