Thursday, 23 June 2016

South west rocks science

Written by 
North Albany High School students learn how marine researcher Bryn Warnock uses diver operated stereo video system for reef fish research in Albany. North Albany High School students learn how marine researcher Bryn Warnock uses diver operated stereo video system for reef fish research in Albany. Liz Tanner

 

MORE than 165 regional Year 10 students explored science pathways, projects and possibilities when the Great Southern Science Council’s Science Rocks Career Expo hit the Albany Marina Boatshed in May.

Discussions ranged from wedge-tail eagle research to fungi genetics and meditative creativity techniques for academics, scientists and community. Demonstrations and displays featured innovations in robotics, fisheries management, coding, remote imaging, surgical techniques and agriculture.

Expo attendees enjoyed the opportunity for demonstrations and Q&A sessions with renowned local scientists, who shared their stories of careers and projects in marine, terrestrial and freshwater ecology, health, engineering, agriculture, natural resource management, technology and geology.

Now in its 3rd year, the popular annual event aims to make all science subjects more accessible to Year 10 students by giving them the opportunity to talk to local and visiting experts and try out activities for themselves in the demonstration section.

“We’re inspired that students can meet our local and visiting scientists to hear about their work and opportunities first-hand, and proud to work with our project partners to bring this event back in 2016”, said Liz Tanner, Great Southern Science Council Project Officer.

Featured speakers included Scitech Maths Multiplier Shyam Drury with his creative and inspirational approach to understanding and appreciating maths in school, work and beyond.

A second short keynote by Stephanie Yoong highlighted her passion for curiosity and her start-up project to provide accessible science study support at all levels. Another 8 scientists gave short talks and Q&A, with 12 more offering displays and demonstrations of their motivating stories of science, discovery and innovation.

One presenter commented that she most enjoyed engaging directly with students in the Question & Answer sessions, and a local Year 10 student agreed his views had changed as a result of the Science Rocks Career Expo experience. “I didn’t know about the grants for projects and about people going to cool places to study and do research,” he said.

Science Rocks Career Expo is presented by Great Southern Science Council, with support from South Coast NRM National Landcare Programme, Regional Development Australia Great Southern, WA Museum Albany, Scitech and Inspiring Australia, an Australian Government initiative.

To get involved, email Liz Tanner This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit www.greatsouthernsciencecouncil.org.au

Read 3408 times